HOURS FOR
THE WEEK OF
MARCH 23

Remember, my hours vary from week to week. And the shop is open at other times by chance or appointment (i.e., call me and tell me when you want to come by).

WHY DID IT TAKE ME SO LONG TO REOPEN, YOU ASK!

Portrait of Bonnie with cookbooks

It has been my great pleasure to serve up a delicious selection of cookbooks to customers near and far for the past 15 years.

If only I’d been able to wave a magic wand and say, “Bookshelves on every wall, please, and try to keep it under $50K per wall.” But that’s not how I (bank)roll, so Beloved Contractor James salvaged every scrap of shelving from the old shop and has now jigsaw-puzzled it into the new space, along with plenty of new shelves, because the new space is bigger!
      Then came painting all those shelves and figuring out where to put all the books and then dealing with the middle of the space (I never had a space with a middle before) . . . well, enough excuses. It was getting lonely here without customers!
      Although there are still a few details to finish up, the shop is now open. The beautiful sign I’ve ordered isn’t here yet, but the door will be open and the welcome will be warm. Please forgive our appearance, as they say, it’s still a bit of a construction site.
            Looking FORWARD!
     — Bonnie


LOOK HERE…

Ellis Island Cookbook cover

The ideal souvenir of a visit to New York: Tom Bernardin’s Ellis Island Cookbook. I also carry the wonderful 1961 Greenwich Village map that Tom has had reprinted. Read about it here.

Italian cookbooks

The Italian cookbooks fill three shelves and, in times of true abbondanza, overflow onto the table and even the floor. The first Italian cookbook published in English in the United States, Simple Italian Cookery by Antonia Isola (a pseudonym), appeared in 1912.